1906 Preparatory School  

                                    

In 1906 the Alexanderwohl Gemeindeschule (community school), later called the Goessel Vorbereitungschule (preparatory school), located at 100 East Main, was organized under the leadership of Elder Peter Balzer. The aim of the institution was to provide a two-year high school curriculum with the purpose of preparing students for further academic training at Bethel College. In the first years the school was funded mainly by the Alexanderwohl congregation, and parents paid tuition.

 

This school was church sponsored and focused on mathematics, English, geography, church and world history. Most of the courses were taught in German. The first term was six months long and tuition was $15.00, or $2.50 a month.  Students who lived too far away to commute lived in the nearby boarding house or with families in Goessel. After completing the two-year program, students were eligible to attend Bethel College, a private church-sponsored college just north of Newton.

 

Students had to be 14 years old or older to attend the Preparatory School. The first enrollment in 1906 consisted of 35 students. In the 1924-1925 school year, the last year the school was open, the enrollment was 42. The Prep School graduated 260 students.

 

 

1906 Prep School | Goessel Museum
GHS stage curtain | Goessel Museum

This lovely handpainted stage curtain hung in the Goessel Rural High School and includes the 1937 junior and senior class mottos. (It is on display in the Prep School).

The Prep School can be rented for  functions at $35 per day.   It has kitchen and restroom facilities, but is not available from October through April, depending on freeze dates.

Call 620.367.8200 or email mhmuseum@mtelco.net Museum office for details.

The Prep School got a new coat of paint in 2016.  See how you can help pay for part of this project.

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Mennonite Heritage and

Agricultural Museum

Krause House | Goessel Museum
Goessel State Bank | Goessel Museum
South Bloomfield School | Goessel Museum
Turkey Red Wheat Palace | Goessel Museum | Mennonite Museum
Schroeder Barn | Goessel Museum
Friesen House | Goessel Museum
Imigrant House replica | Goessel Museum

Each of the 8 buildings tells a different story.

After Tabor Mennonite Church organized in 1908 and Goessel Mennonite Church organized in 1920, they joined in supporting the school. The institution's income, however, could not keep up with increasing costs. In 1925, members of the three supporting churches decided to close the school and send their children to Goessel Rural HIgh School, which had been organized that year. Parents were assured that their children would receive religious instruction at the public school.  

 

The building continued to be used by the High School as classrooms for its industrial arts program into the 1970s. It was the first structure moved to the Museum grounds. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the 1906 Prep School building housed a restaurant, "The 1906" (for a short time). It was operated by two successive managers.

 

Construction of the Goessel Rural High School building. The 1906 Prep School can be seen in the background, next to the much bigger dormatory building.

Construction of the Goessel Rural High School
Imigrant House replica | Goessel Museum
Turkey Red Wheat Palace | Goessel Museum | Mennonite Museum
Schroeder Barn | Goessel Museum
Friesen House | Goessel Museum
Krause House | Goessel Museum
Goessel State Bank | Goessel Museum
South Bloomfield School | Goessel Museum

Each of the 8 buildings tells a different story.

Read about the 6-6-6-6 tornado that hit Goessel

2014-2019 Mennonite Heritage

and Agricultural Museum

Created by Fern Bartel nee Schmidt

 

GHS stage curtain | Goessel Museum