Each of the 8 buildings tells a different story.

Imigrant House replica | Goessel Museum
Turkey Red Wheat Palace | Goessel Museum | Mennonite Museum
Schroeder Barn | Goessel Museum
Friesen House | Goessel Museum
Krause House | Goessel Museum
South Bloomfield School | Goessel Museum
1906 Prep School | Goessel Museum | Mennonite Museum

Our Story

The Museum is a living tribute to the people who settled in what is now the Goessel community.  It tells the story of Low-German Mennonite families who left the steppes of Russia for religious freedom in 1874 and chose the Kansas prairie for their new home.

 

Dedicated in 1974, the Museum complex was established to preserve the memory of our ancestors and the artifacts from early households, farms, schools, churches and the hospital in our Mennonite community.

In the Immigrant House replica is a room recreating the living conditions of the first few monthes in this country.

Replication of interior-Immigrant House | Goessel Museum

Mennonite furniture featuring hand-painted wood grain.

Russian clock

These clocks were treasured possessions and were very carefully brought over from Russia.

In the Immigrant House building, there are about 30 family display cases that include belongings of our ancestors. Some of these artifact are the very articles that were brought with them from Russia in 1874.

  

To the right is a death shroud.  Oral tradition has it that Russian government required each immigrant to have a shroud, in the event of their death at sea.

Death shroud | Goessel Museum
South Bloomfield one room school | Goessel Museum

South Bloomfield School is a typical one-room rural school house. In years past one-room schools could be seen dotting the country side, about every two square miles.

 

 

South Bloomfield School | Goessel Museum
Sculpture | Goessel Museum

"Plowshares" an outdoor metal sculpture (the welded metal sculpture is 650 pounds) and depicts the biblical saying "and they shall beat their swords into plowshares" an idea from Isaiah 2 : 4.  It was presented to the Museum by A.J. "Arlie" Regier of Overland Park, to celebrate the Centennial of the Mennonites' arrival to Kansas in '74.

The destructive swords are sculpted into a plowshare, a tool used to produce food. The heavy plow beam has no handle, symbolizing that much labor formerly done by hands, is now performed through technological means. Various types of wheat heads symbolize change.

 

The families that settled here were farmers and brought with them the Turkey Red Wheat.  For threshing the wheat they brought along a pattern to make this threshing stone to use in this country.

Agriculture was the life of our forefathers and mothers.  Life on the farm required hard work from every able body. The Turkey Red Wheat Palace attemts to show, with tools and implements, that part of the story. 

Schroeder Barn | Goessel Museum
Mennonite painted furniture | Goessel Museum
Immigrant House replica
Turkey Red Wheat Palace
Schroeder Barn
Friesen House
Krause House
Goessel State Bank building
South Bloomfield one-room school
1906 Preparatory School
Friesen House | Goessel Museum
Krause House | Goessel Museum
South Bloomfield School | Goessel Museum
1906 Prep School | Goessel Museum
Imigrant House replica | Goessel Museum
Goessel State Bank | Goessel Museum

To read accounts of hog butchering and rural farm life.

Each of the 8 buildings tells a different story.

Imigrant House replica | Goessel Museum
Horse drawn plow and Wheat Palace building
Turkey Red Wheat Palace | Goessel Museum | Mennonite Museum
Threshing Stone | Goessel Museum
Russian Wall Clock| Goessel Museum
Alexanderwohl Mennonite Church | Goessel Museum
Goessel Mennonite Church | Goessel Museum
Tabor Mennonite Church | Goessel Museum

The Three Area Mennonite Churches

 

891 Chisholm Trail

Newton, KS 67114-7503

620.367.2318

Email : tabor@tabormennonite.org

109 S. Church St.

Goessel, KS 67053

620.367.2446

Email : goesselchurch@mtelco.net

1304 Hwy K-15

Box 8

Goessel, KS 67053

620.367.8192

Email : alexmenno@mtelco.net